NEWS

COVID-19 OVERVIEW

COVID-19 is caused by a new type of coronavirus. Until late 2019, this type of coronavirus ( 44 Holland Avenue, Albany NY 12229 | omh.ny.gov) was unknown. The virus is thought to first infect the tissue inside the nose or the throat and then spread lower down into the lungs. In most cases, the illness is mild or moderate and most people recover. However, some people may become very ill and require emergency hospitalization, particularly those over 50 years old, with medical problems such as asthma or diabetes, or those who smoke tobacco or e-cigarettes. 

The infection spreads between persons who are in close contact with one another through respiratory droplets formed when an infected person coughs or sneezes. The infection may also spread when individuals touch contaminated surfaces and then touch their face. Covering coughs and sneezes with a tissue or in an elbow; washing hands frequently with water and soap for 20 seconds or using an alcohol-based hand sanitizer; and avoiding touching the face are critical steps to protecting oneself and others. Recent studies have shown that a significant portion of individuals infected with the virus are asymptomatic. Asymptomatic individuals, even if they eventually develop symptoms, can transmit the virus to others before showing symptoms. 

The main symptoms of the infection are a fever of over 100.4 degrees, a new cough within the last seven days, shortness of breath, or a new sore throat within the last seven days. 

PHYSICAL DISTANCING 

Physical distancing is a prevention technique aimed at slowing the spread of the virus. People are asked to stay at home and limit contact with those who do not live in their home. Public health measures to close schools, eat-in restaurant dining, gyms, libraries, theaters, and so forth are all part of this approach. This drastic action is meant to prevent people from getting sick and overwhelming the healthcare system. 

"From: Mental Health Residential Program to: New York State Office of Mental Health; Covid-19 Infection Control Guidance for OMH Residential and Site Based Programs: Memorandum Issued May 11, 2020" 

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CLEAN HANDS SAVES LIVES

"The following guidance is based on the most current Centers for Disease Control and Prevention(CDC) and NYS Department of Health (DOH) recommendations for prevention of the spread the novel coronavirus of 2019 disease (COVID-19) and the management of Persons Under Investigation (PUI)"

REPORT YOUR SYMPTOMS IMMEDIATELY

  • STAY IN YOUR ROOM!! 
  • CALL YOUR CASE MANAGER AND YOUR DOCTOR IF YOU HAVE (FEVER, COUGH, EXTREME DRY THROAT) OR IF YOU HAVE BEEN IN CONTACT WITH SOMEONE WHO HAS COVID-19

KEEP YOURSELF AND OTHERS SAFE

  1. Wash hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or use hand sanitizer when soap is not available
  2. Avoid close contact with sick people
  3. Stay home if you are sick
  4. Cover coughs or sneezes with a tissue, then discard it into the trash
  5. Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces

IF YOU HAVE TO GO OUTSIDE...

  • Consumers should stay in their residence as much as possible but if you go out; WEAR A MASK & KEEP AT LEAST 6 FEET AWAY FROM OTHERS. 
  • Upon returning home, WASH YOUR HANDS and DISCARD DISPOSABLE MASKS and GLOVES. Consumers in residences should prevent non-residences from visiting

COVID-19 ECONOMIC IMPACT PAYMENT

United States (US) citizens and resident aliens who meet the following criteria are eligible to receive the COVID-19  economic impact payment:

  • Have a valid Social Security Number (SSN)
  • Could not be claimed as a dependent by another taxpayer and; 
  • Have adjusted gross income under certain limits


News and Information

Rent Regulations

Dear Network Members: 

There were a number of bills for which the Network was advocating and following at the end of this year's legislative session including rent regulation, prevailing wage, and two Office of Mental Health housing bills. 

RENT REGULATIONS 

On Friday, June 14", the NYS Legislature passed and the Governor signed the "Housing Stability and Tenant Protection Act of 2019" (16520823), 24 hours before the rent regulation laws were set to expire. The bill encompasses a large number of rent regulation changes and protections and makes them permanent. 

One piece of the legislation includes language that would extend rent stabilization protections to all nonprofit scattered-site providers that were previously exempted because of their status as a corporation or nonprofit. It also includes language that would ensure the 14,000 units of existing scattered-site housing be afforded rent regulation protections upon lease renewal. 

A special thank you to the sponsors and champions of the bill, Senator Brian Kavanagh and Assemblymember Latoya Joyner as well as Assemblymember Steven Cymbrowitz, who was the originator of the bill. Also a special thank you to Women in Need who first raised this issue back in 2017 and all of our members who provided invaluable and ongoing guidance and support about how this legislation would impact our scattered-site portfolio. 

  • YOU ARE ELIGIBLE FOR THIS PAYMENT; CONTACT YOUR CASE MANAGER IF YOU HAVEN'T RECEIVED YOUR FUNDS

Site Content

Heat Advisory

Hot humid weather-particularly a series of hot, humid days can cause serious illness, including heat cramps, heat exhaustion, and heatstroke. While anyone, under certain circumstances, can be affected by these illnesses, some people are in much greater danger and should take extra precautions. 

When in periods of high temperature and humidity, there are things everyone (and, particularly, people at high risk) should do to lessen the chances of heat illnesses: 

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Avoid overexertion, particularly during warmer periods of the day. 

Those in the greatest danger of succumbing to the most serious heat illnesses are older persons, those with special medical problems (especially when accompanied by obesity), and those taking certain medications, including psychotropic drugs. In addition, contrary to popular belief, dark skin is no prevention against heat illnesses. 

Keep windows shut, and draperies, shades, or blinds drawn during the heat of the day. (Open windows in the evening or night hours when the air outside is cooler.) 

 

Move to cooler rooms during the heat of the day 

Drink plenty of fluids 

Foremost among heat illnesses are heat cramps, heat exhaustion (or prostration), and, the most serious, heatstroke (or sunstroke).